Hawaii service members launch large-scale cleanup

Civilians, Sailors and Airmen in the Hawaii region host a large-scale cleanup near a military housing area on Oahu, Jan. 19. The event is a part of a larger scale effort by Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and Navy Region Hawaii to join the community in improving the quality of life on the island.

Story and photos by MC1 Corwin Colbert

Navy Region Hawaii Public Affairs

Civilians, Sailors and Airmen in the Hawaii region area came together to host a large-scale cleanup near a military housing area on Oahu, Jan. 19.

The event is a part of a larger scale effort by Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and Navy Region Hawaii to join the community in improving the quality of life on the island.

“As we start 2018, my challenge to the Joint Base team is to seek ways that we can improve or make an impact throughout our military and local community,” said JBPHH Command Master Chief Allen Keller.

Throughout the morning and into the afternoon; Sailors, Airmen, Hunt’s housing employees and city workers cleared more than 75 shrubs along a fence line on Nimitz Highway and disposed of trash. Service members of all ranks including Rear Adm. Brian Fort, commander, Navy Region Hawaii, worked together efficiently to make the event a success.

Civilians, Sailors and Airmen in the Hawaii region participate in the large-scale cleanup near a military housing area on Oahu, Jan. 19.

Airman 1st Class Mason S. Buckley, 392nd Intelligence Squadron, said he was encouraged and surprised about the scale of the cleanup.

“This was a really big project and I am glad I was a part of it,” he said. “We cut down a lot of shrubs along the fence line. I enjoyed working with the Navy. They are pretty friendly to the other services and I will definitely do more community cleanups in the future.”

Chief Machinist’s Mate (Non-Nuclear, Submarine Auxiliary) Derrien Walters of Naval Submarine Support Center, Pearl Harbor shared Buckley’s sentiment about the cleanup.

“We came out to take care of some overgrown vegetation and trash by Caitlin Drive,” he said. “I have done this type of cleanup before. This is definitely larger scale than I expected. It was very encouraging to see the city here to support with their mulcher and other equipment to clear away the vegetation we cut down.”

Keller said this event affects the lives of not only the service members, but the community and families as well.

“Cleaning up the Nimitz corridor was the first of this endeavor. The efforts of the Sailors and Airmen that participated in this event greatly improved the landscape for our families that live in that community and all those who travel the Nimitz corridor,” Keller said.

Walters believes community involvement is crucial in the relationship between the military and Hawaii.

“It is very important for the military to show we care about the community and Hawaii itself. It is important that we help keep Hawaii clean and in excellent condition.”

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Category: News